How to Resize and Compress Several Images at Once in Windows 10 for FREE

If you work a lot with images; be it for blog posts or some other web content, you must have realized how important it is to compress your images. Using uncompressed images is widely known to be one of the most common causes of webpages being too slow to load up. There are several possible ways to compress your images for such blog post and web content. The most optimal compression tools use the lossless compression algorithm where the image size is compressed while the picture quality remains the same to the human eyes. In the past I had tried using different methods to do this for my blog posts. First, I tried using the good old Microsoft picture manager from Office 2007, it worked fairly well, but the compression option is limited to only 3 categories of images, namely documents, webpages and email messages.

However, oftentimes, none of these categories actually fits the image size and quality I need for my blogs. Another solution I tried was to use a plugin on WordPress. This also came with its own limitations. Not only was it a paid plugin, it also limited the number of images I could compress with the subscription, beyond a specified quota, I will need to pay more to compress more images. In addition, the compression options were also as limited as the Microsoft picture manager, the only advantage was that it saved me some time since I didn’t need to compress the images one after the other.

The solution here pretty much addresses all these limitations.

  • It is completely free (You can buy them coffee if you are impressed, I sure was)
  • It gives you a much wider range of compression options.
  • It compresses an unlimited number of images and,
  • It is generally fast.

The awesome tool that does all these is the Caesium Image Compressor, a free image compressing app.

You can download it from saerasoft.com. This app comes in three forms, you can either download the normal executable version which you will install on Windows and run normally, or you could download the portable version which you can simply unzip and run from a portable medium like a USB flash drive or from any folder on your computer. The third option is the source code for developers, we won’t worry about that.

Here I will be using the installer version, which is the regular executable version of the app. The installation process is pretty typical, simply select your preferred language, accept the license agreement, and just hit next on subsequent dialog boxes till you finish the installation.

After the installation, on launching the app you should have a page like this pop-up.

Here you can use the add button to locate the folder where you have your images and add them from there.

You could also simply open the folder with your images, select all using Ctrl + A and drag them into the white space on Caesium.

So here I have some screenshots I have taken  to use for a blog post, as you can see, this is quite a good number of images, and each image is about 1 megabyte in size, so for these 35 images, we are talking about 35 MB, that’s quite a lot for one blog post, so certainly I need compression. So first I select and drag the images to the white space on the Caesium compressor.

For the most part, you wouldn’t need to change any of the settings from the tools menu, all you need to do is to go to the compression option and simply set the quality to the level you want. Here you can choose from 1 to a hundred different quality levels. I normally like to set mine to 80%, and then check the box that says “Same for all”. You can also change to your preferred format. I leave mine as JPEG. You can further choose to adjust the width and height by checking the Resize box. Sizes are in pixels.

Then next you need to select the output folder where you need the compressed images to be saved. Is advisable to create another folder in the same directory as the folder with the uncompressed images. Here I will call mine img-comp, select that as the output folder.

Then finally hit the compress button to begin the compression process.

After the compression, you should have a dialog box like this show a summary of the outcome, 35 images compressed, 0 skipped, 0 errors, 9.55 seconds. And with that I saves about 25 megabytes in total.

Now when you go to the output folder, you will find all the compresses images there. For 80% compression, I have my images around 150KB in size. The fascinating thing about this approach to compression is that I could hardly tell any difference between the original images and the compressed images. You can check that out in the video below. So for sure I’m more than okay with the compression quality. You can check to see if the size and quality are okay for you. If not, you can simply go back and adjust the size and quality over and over till you get the size and quality you want.

And finally, if you want to use the portable version, simply download the zipped file.

Unzip to a drive or location of your choice.

In the unzipped folder, you will find the Caesium.exe file, simply double-click on that, and you will have the same exact interface show up.

Hope you found this useful. If you have any questions regarding the procedures, please post in the comment section to get more help. The video below demonstrates most of the suggestions discussed above.

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